Diana Steele’s Edmonton

The mayoral candidate wants to see
Edmonton and its communities ‘thrive’

Diana Steele has known for “a very long time” that she wants to “to lead this city.”  (Steele’s website)

By Chris Ranta

MORE THAN ANYTHING, Diana Steele wants to see a bigger and brighter future for Edmonton. The mayoral candidate, the second to throw her hat in the ring, is running on a campaign promising to support Edmonton and make it a better place for everyone.

Like Cheryll Watson, Steele got her campaign started early. She announced her intentions to run in December and submitted her nomination papers in January.

“I know, and have known for a very long time, that I want to lead this city,” she said in a tweet on Dec. 8. “I didn’t need to be talked into it, wooed or courted. The only alliances I will form are with the citizens of Edmonton. I’m here and I’m ready.”

Or, as she told The Magpie: “I intend on making sure all our communities thrive.”

Steele also has spent more time in business than politics. As her website bio explains, she has run three small businesses in the past two decades, while also teaching at NorQuest. However, it adds, she has also developed policies for the Alberta government and is on contract with the federal government, though it doesn’t say in what capacity.

As well, she is the president of Crestwood Community League and works with the Pilgrims Hospice Society.

As for her platform, Steele’s plans to focus on economic growth, homeless, and business and property taxes.

She aims to “offer enticing tax rates for business retention and attraction,” as well as “promote and support local business like we never have before,” to boost the city’s economy – especially in the wake of COVID-19.

She also says she wants to put an end to the homeless situation in the city, much like fellow candidate, Brian Gregg.

“This is critical,” she explains in her platform statement.

“Homelessness is demonstrably more expensive to ignore than it is to solve. Cities are reducing, and even ending, homelessness, and we can too.”

 


→  Don Iveson’s legacy
→  Brian Gregg’s Edmonton
→  Kim Krushell’s Edmonton
→  Mike Nickel’s Edmonton
→  Cheryll Watson’s Edmonton
→  Our correspondents discuss the campaign

 

Steele supports creating a more sustainable city, explaining in her platform her desire to “protect our natural resources and amenities for our residents and future generations.” She wants to work on expanding the city’s public transit, and hopes to work with Calgary “to explore inter-city rail feasibility.”

However, the most emphasis in her platform is a promise to see communities in Edmonton thrive. She aims to support Edmonton’s families and communities, as they are “imperative to the well-functioning of our city.”

“I want to ensure that all families have access to sports, recreation and activities in community centres,” she told The Magpie. “We will develop community gardens across the city and build stronger partnerships with community leagues, who are the heart of each community. We will provide education around tolerance and diversity to help close the divide we are currently facing.”

While she says she has no specific plans for downtown at this point, she does want to hear what citizens think will help “revitalize” the core.

“I want to call on Edmontonians to help council with revitalizing downtown, since they are the ones we are relying on attracting to our core,” she told The Magpie. “We have a plethora of talented humans in our lovely city who are just waiting for the opportunity to share their thoughts and ideas. Let’s hear what they have to say.”

If you wish to get in contact with Steele or learn more about her campaign, you can do so here.


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